ACADEMICS

Philosophy Department

CORE COURSES
PH 1101: INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY.
Aim: To bring to the student’s mind a clear conception of what Philosophy itself is about.
To examine all the specific areas of the subject the students will encounter in the program at PCJ. By the end of the course, the students will be able to ponder the commonest problems and questions of philosophy, as they have intrigued philosophers through the ages.
To indicate some modern applications of the perennial questions of Philosophy.
PH 1102: ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY.
Aim: To introduce students to the idea of philosophy as a discipline of critical thought, and to expose them to some of the methods and vocabulary which may facilitate such thought.
To familiarize students with the great Greek thinkers of Antiquity and to introduce students to philosophical thoughts and themes.
PH 1201: HISTORY OF WESTERN IDEAS.
Aim: To introduce the student to the great periods of western Philosophy, their spirit and main representatives, so that they may understand the main questions and the main answers of each era
PH 1202: MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY
Aim: To deepen the students’ understanding of Western Philosophy already studied in the History of Ancient Philosophy, and help them appreciate the efforts of Christian, Moslem and Jewish Philosophers in reconciling reason with revelation.
PH 1103: LOGIC
Aim: This course is designed to enable students using traditional logic to discover fallacious reasoning. It requires a grasp of basic Aristotelian notions about how we reason, the basic structure of deductive reasoning and syllogistic rules. It also presents “everyday logic”- how to detect fallacies in ordinary discussions and how to refute them. The core of the course requires understanding of traditional formal logic, propositions, syllogisms, fallacies.
PH 2201: PHILOSOPHICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
Aim: To help students reach a sound, comprehensive philosophical understanding of the human person, which in turn introduces good human conduct. To help the student develop and justify critical and responsible attitudes of life.
PH 3201: METAPHYSICS
Aim: To understand the human longing for the truth. To seek the ultimate cause of reality seen and experienced in the world.
PH 2102: EPISTEMOLOGY
Aim: To help the student understand the value and limits of human knowledge.
PH2103: AFRICAN PHILOSOPHY
Aim: The course provides a brief and accurate introduction to African Philosophy. It explores the perennial problems of Philosophy in Africa such as: is there an African Philosophy? It also deals with the newly influential concerns in African Philosophy e.g., African feminist philosophy, ethics and politics.
PH 2202: GENERAL ETHICS
Aim: To introduce students to the fundamental question of ethics, i.e., how we ought to live. To examine various historical theories that have attempted to answer this question. To give students the basic tools required to attempt to answer complex moral questions.
PH 3103: SOCIAL ETHICS
Aim: The course explores the concrete practice of morality. That is, how the general ethical principles apply to particular ‘real – life’ situations.
ADDITIONAL REQUIRED COURSES
PH 2101: MODERN PHILOSOPHY
Aim: To prepare students to see the origin of subjectivity and individualism. To put the student on guard against “Scientism” and the natural scientific method applied to Philosophy. To bring out the perennial nature of three main problems which recur in every age: the problem of God, of self and of the World.
PH 3101: CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY
Aim: To show the student that the perennial questions of Philosophy continue to be asked in the Twentieth Century. That Philosophy is not a finished task but an ongoing process: each generation must grapple with philosophical problems against the background of its time.
PH 3102: THEODICY
Aim: To understand the natural basis of religious faith and religious experience by looking critically at the question of God and the religious language on God through the various solutions which have been given. To enable students question and unmask inadequate conceptions and approach god’s mystery through reflection on personal experience and research.
PH 3107: PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION
Aim: To have a comprehensive understanding of the problems of philosophy of religion.
To have a greater awareness of the role of religion in human life and a due respect for other religions.
To encourage students to research for themselves about the current issues and challenges regarding religious belief such as: atheism, religious pluralism, and religious fundamentalism.
PH 2203: POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
Aim: To draw the attention of the students to some prejudiced views about politics, such as: “politics is a dirty game”. Does politics necessarily have to be ‘dirty’? Is it entirely so, everywhere, all the time? The course will highlight the indispensable value of politics. As Kenneth Minogue in his work Politics: A Very Short Introduction, points out: It is politics that “sustains the common world in which we may talk each other …[it] is the activity by which the framework of human life is sustained; [though] it is not life itself.”

zovirax over the counter

PH 3104: PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE
Aim: To help the student understand the logic or model of Scientific methodology and the progress of science over the centuries, starting from ancient times, up to the most recent achievements of science.
PH 3202: PHILOSOPHY OF NATURE
Aim: To understand the nature of the universe. To discover deeper and remote causes of the material phenomena which science through its methods involves observation and experiment, cannot reveal. To notice contradiction that scientists into when trying to explain nature
PH 2104: RESEARCH METHODS IN PHILOSOPHY
Aim: To prepare philosophy students to think and present their thoughts in a systematic, coherent and intelligible way. Students to understand philosophy as a distinctive academic discipline and methods employed in philosophical investigation.
PH 3106: FAITH AND REASON
Aim: To help students grasp the central message of Fides et Ratio and analyze the way in which the contemporary mindset challenges the acquisition and defense of faith, especially in the context of the Catholic Church.
ELECTIVE COURSES
The following elective courses are offered on a rotational basis by the Philosophy Department:
PHE 2001: PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION
Aim: To enable students understand the philosophical foundations of the theory and practice of education.
PHE 1004: INVESTIGATION INTO DEEP DEMOCRACY
Aim: To investigate why “democracy” seems to be a popular catch phrase today. Why the reality behind the concept seems to be attractive to many.
PHE 1005: EXISTENTIALISM
Aim: To introduce students to and acquaint them with the central theme of Existentialism, i.e., the meaning of Life.
PHE 2002: PHILOSOPHY OF THE ENLIGHTENMENT
Aim: To explain the dispersion and the acceptance of the ‘new’ philosophy, i.e., the explanation of the physical world in the light of Galileo and Newton, and its effects on life and thought in the Eighteenth Century. We begin with Descartes, Spinoza, Locke and Newton, then proceed to Voltaire, Montesquieu and Rousseau, with special attention to Kant and Hume.
PHE 1001: CRITICAL THINKING
Aim: This course will examine various aspects of human thinking and argumentation in order to enhance good and correct ways of doing clear thinking. Critical thinking has its basis in intellectual values that cut across all disciplines.
PHE 2004: ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
Aim: The primary aim of this course is to introduce students to the Global challenge of Climate change. It also aims at identifying the key issues in the environmental disputes like energy use, population growth, wilderness and species preservation, and toxic waste disposal.
At the end of the course, the students will be able to discern the action needed locally, to save our planet for future generations.
PHE 2005: PHILOSOPHY OF LAW
Aim: To understand law, its functions, the various kinds of law and the principle areas in which law is concerned.
PHE 1003: THOMAS HOBBES’ LEVIATHAN
Aim: To introduce to students one of the great socio – political theorists, Thomas Hobbes, by reading his original work, Leviathan. This is in view of bringing students to a deeper understanding of the meaning and value of Society. The exploration Hobbes’ social – political thought is meant to lead students to a critical awareness of the socio – political systems of their own countries.
PHE 2003: PLATO’S REPUBLIC
Aim: To read an Ancient work about Social / Political problems.
To familiarize students with the main arguments of Plato’s Republic.
To contrast the problems raised by the ancient Greeks with those raised in subsequent philosophy.
Current issues: the exploration of Plato’s republic is meant to lead students to a critical analysis of the current political systems, and of the concrete life situations in which they find themselves.
PHE 1002: HEIDEGGER’S BEING AND TIME
Aim: The aim of the course is to offer a critical analysis and close reading of Division One in Heidegger’s magnum opus, Being and Time. The central concepts being studied are Heidegger’s ontological analysis of the being of equipment (Zuhandensein) and the being of humans (Dasein). We will look at how Heidegger used phenomenological analysis of the ontological structure of common everyday entities in order to present arguably the most radical philosophical thesis of the 20th century.